World’s first Vertical Forest City in China

Let’s take a look at the world’s first and only, Vertical Forest City in China, which is comprised of both vertical garden as well as residential accommodations designed in the perfect blend, by Italian architect, Stefano Boeri.

This remarkable piece of architecture is located 70 kilometres east of Wuhan and is providing home to thousands of people and over 5000 shrubs and trees. All the foliage that is included in this building has been carefully selected from native species.

The residential complex comprises of five towers, of which two are designated for residential purposes and the rest for commercial and hotel spaces. This architectural space contains both open and closed balcony that gives a sense of movement to this design. It is estimated that every year, these plants, flowers and shrubs will be able to absorb 22 tons of carbon dioxide a year, while giving out 11 tons of fresh oxygen for its residents.

world’s first vertical forest city in china 2

This Vertical Forest model can essentially change the landscape of future cities and ecological life as the inhabitants in this complex can experience both urban space while they are surrounded by nature all around them.

Read full story here: https://www.archdaily.com/874364/worlds-first-vertical-forest-city-breaks-ground-in-china

 

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